Save The Earth: It's The Only Planet With Beer: Podcast Graphic Cover Art

PODCAST GUESTS

Brian Perkey

Brian is a 30-year industry veteran that is currently the Senior Key Account Manager/North America for Lallemand Brewing. After 18 years of holding several Brewing production roles, Brian left the Brew-deck and has been on the ingredients and supply side ever since. Brian enjoys using his practical experience to help identify and troubleshoot issues in the Brewhouse and brings a solutions-based approach in helping Brewers achieve their desired results.

MORE EPISODES

SEASON 3, EPISODE 9: THAT’S THIOL FOLKS!

PODCAST HOSTS:

TOBY TUCKER – DIRECTOR OF SALES, COUNTRY MALT GROUP

HEATHER JERRED – TERRITORY MANAGER, COUNTRY MALT GROUP

GRANT LAWRENCE – TERRITORY MANAGER, COUNTRY MALT GROUP

GUESTS:

BRIAN PERKEY – NORTH AMERICA SENIOR KEY ACCOUNT MANAGER, LALLEMAND BREWING

Key Points From This Episode:

  • Are thiols just a buzz word? Thiols are a new and deeper understanding of the process of biotransformation and understanding it is not just glucosidase that are contributing to these crazy, juicy aromas.

  • Thiols are another name for a specific group of sulfur compounds also known as Mercaptans. Flavors/Aromas of thiols in sensory have much lower thresholds than many other compounds.

  • Where are thiols found? Thiol precursors are found in higher concentrations in specific hop varietals and in malts that are lightly kilned, but yeast does not have thiols. Certain yeasts contain the right enzymes to unlock these tropical thiol flavors from their malt & hop derived precursor compounds.

  • What is Phantasm? Dried ground grape skins loaded with thiols.

  • Which three β-lyase specific yeasts can be used for thiol release: BRY-27 American West Coast Ale Yeast, Verdant IPA Yeast, and LalBrew Nottingham™ Performance Ale Yeast.

  • How to get the thiol flavors and aromas you are after: lean towards lightly kilned malts for your grist bill, use high thiol pre-cursor containing hop varietals such as cascade via mash hopping during brewing, and finally make sure to use yeast strains that can cleave up the thiols to make them soluble in the finished beer.